Giving Back to Our Communities


Grants

Past GranteesSubmission Process

Cook Native American Ministries Foundation (CNAMF) considers grant proposals that encourage leadership development for ministry programs and other initiatives that support the mission of CNAMF. Agencies and emerging non-profit organizations, as well as congregations and denominations who work actively in Native communities across the country are encouraged to apply. CNAMF also encourages grant applicants to consider matching gifts and other resource development incentives as part of their planned operational activities. 

Grants of up to $10,000 are awarded to tax exempt organizations classified as 501 (c) (3) charities by the Internal Revenue Service. Grants are not made to individuals. Capital items such as buildings, vehicles, equipment are not generally approved for funding. CNAMF does not provide funding to support capital campaigns, deficit financing, endowment efforts, or grants to individuals or general operations funding.  

Frequently Asked Questions

Priority funding areas include: ChurchesEducationHealth and WellnessLeadership ProgramsReligious Education and Ministerial Activities 

If you have a current active grant as of July 31, 2019, you are not eligible for the 2020 funding cycle. 

Grants are made only from earnings of CNAMF’s Endowment and Donor restricted gifts.

CNAMF’s Board reserves the right to decline any funding request.

CNAMF’s office will begin accepting the Letters of Intent (LOI)  May 20th, 2019 for funding cycle 2020.

LOI Deadline is July 31, 2019 no later than 5:00pm AZ MST for the 2020 funding cycle.

LOI received on or after August 1, 2019 will not be considered but may be held for consideration in the future.

Frequently Asked Questions

Our grant cycle for 2019 is no longer accepting applications. The next available cycle will be for 2020.

 

Past Grantees

Submission Process


We’ve made this process as easy as possible. Below you’ll find directions for submitting your Letter of Intent.

Step 1:

a. Check Grant Guidelines. Determine whether the project plan and the sponsoring organization meet the requirements detailed in the General Guidelines. For clarification or other questions related to whether the project is consistent with the guidelines, email grants@cooknam.org

b. Create a Letter of Intent (LOI). Develop a realistic and feasible project or program that will create Hope and Opportunities for the next generation of Native American Leaders.

Step 2:

Submit a Letter of Intent (email or US mail) and explained in two pages (500 words) or less telling us:  

– About your project/program and how it meets one of the priority funding areas.

– What amount of funds are you requesting?

– How will the grant funds be expended?

– What will the outcome or impact?

You may write a narrative, tell a story or use outline form: we are interested in your passion for this program/project.  Microsoft Word documents are welcome. When communicating by email we will confirm your message as received. Please do not send photos or brochures; use paperclips and do not punch, staple or use binding or plastic covers. Invest your time in content rather than presentation.

Letter of Intent must be received in our office by: July 31st, 2019 by 5:00pm AZ MST.

Step 3:

Letters of Intent (LOI) will be reviewed by CNAMF Grant Committee. The Grant Committee will select LOI that best reflect CNAMFs mission and have the greatest potential to create Hope and Opportunities within the next generation of Native American leaders. Those organizations will be contacted and invited by CNAMF to submit a full grant proposal.

Unannounced visits to the CNAMF office is not encouraged. Please e-mail grants@cooknam.org to arrange an office visit, grantee site tour or any meeting with staff.

Grant Guidelines and Tips

Cook Native American Ministries Foundation (CNAMF) creates HOPE and OPPORTUNITIES for the next generation of Native American Leaders through our grant program. CNAMF seeks to find partners through the grant program that will create projects and programs that grow our Native American youth and inspire them to the be the next generation of leaders in their communities, churches, and beyond. CNAMF aims to make grants to organizations that present projects and programs in the following priority funding areas:

– Education
– Leadership
– Healthcare
– Faith Based programs
– For Religious Activities

Here are some guidelines specific to your application:

Provide background information on your organization. State your organization’s mission. Give a brief history and include any major accomplishments.

Tell us about your organization and its structure.
1.Describe your core group, instructors, staff, trainers, etc.
2.List members of your governing body or Board of Directors.
3.Describe your organization’s decision-making process.
4.Is Native American leadership present in your organization?
5.Do you collaborate or network with other organizations?
6.Provide a brief description of what your organization will look like 3 or 5 years from now.

Guiding Philosophies
1.Describe what Native American leadership means in the context of your organization’s community, project, and purpose.
2.Briefly explain how your organization fits our funding priorities and how this project or ministry compliments CNAMF’s mission statement.
3.Describe how your project will create changes in church or society, as opposed to individual change.

Project, Program, or Ministry
1.Describe the need for which you are requesting funds.
2.State the goal(s) of your project. Please list dates of activity and/or completion of goals.
3.How will your project encourage, support, recruit, train, mentor, or mold Native American leadership for church and society?
4.List any anticipated “in kind” contributions this project will receive from parent or partners organizations, tribes, churches, donors, and volunteers.
5.Is there an evaluation plan to measure the program’s progress and/or success?

Here are some tips for your grant application:

1. The intent is to jumpstart your project, get your idea off the ground or help you build a program further. It is not meant to be the sole source of funding for the program or project. If it is new, tell us where you intend to search for future resources or support.

2. The Process: the CNAMF Grants Committee reviews concept papers and invites selected churches or organizations to submit the full proposal. Full proposals are reviewed and grantees are selected.

6. Know your objective, how much it costs and how to evaluate your progress or success. a) What are your goals? How do your goals relate to CNAMF objectives as they pertain to Indian youth and leadership? b) Even if you do not know exact cost give your best estimate. Do your homework. c) How will you assess your progress? Surveys? Interviews?

7. Budget: we do not fund scholarships for individuals, salaries for staff or equipment. a) We’re interested in where other income may come from. b) Be as specific as possible.

3. If invited, full proposals are due by November 1.

4. We fund churches, faith-based organizations and Indian non-profits. You must have your 501(c) 3 in hand at time of application to be considered OR be eligible to submit under your church’s tax exempt status. Churches and faithbased organizations receive priority consideration.

8. Specifics matter: how many participants? Who is involved elders, leadership, or youth? Which tribes? Who are your partners? Where will the program or outreach happen?

9. If you don’t apply this year, think about next year! Letters of intent are due July 31 and if invited, full proposals due November 1.

5. Targeted projects: Native American youth and leadership. Be able to describe in detail how your project or initiative supports and empowers youth, fosters leadership development and training, and does so in a way that is culturally relevant to Indian communities. Your narrative is your chance to convey to the reviewers why your project matters and how it impacts your targeted audience

10. We want to be your partner!

  

CNAMF is a faith based 501(c)3 that strongly encourages other faith based and religious organizations to apply to our grant program as CNAMF wants to be a resource to help foster the next generation of Native American leaders. CNAMF encourages grant applicants to consider matching gift and other resource development incentives as part of their activity.

Grants are not made to individuals; funds are awarded only to 501(c)3 charities: Capital items (buildings, vehicles, equipment) are not generally approved for funding. Organizations who are applying for charitable status should contact grants@cooknam.org.

Letters of Intent (LOI) and other communications with CNAMF must be in writing, by email or letter. (grants@cooknam.org).

Frequently Asked Questions

Grants FAQ

CNAMF’s goal in 2015 was to implement an estate gifts program to result in wills, and planned gifts to meet our future endowment goals.

Our desire is to become established as a Native American Foundation in the philanthropic community. Our short term goal is to create an effective social media tool that will enhance funding via annual appeals and giving campaigns, and major gifts.

In five years, CNAMF will position itself so it meets the giving desires of its current and potential donors.

The CNAMF Board reserves the right to decline any funding request. CNAMF does not give legal advice.

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When a grant is awarded, a grantee/grantor agreement is signed; and a schedule of regular reports is developed. A final evaluation report is required within one year of the last CNAMF payment of the grant or at end of the project, whichever comes first.

In addition to written reports, the CNAMF Board of Directors and staff, strives to visit grant sites during the term of the Grantee. Friends and supporters of CNAMF are also encouraged to visit project sites.

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It is our goal that every request receives fair consideration and that wise decisions are made. However, since many more requests are expected than funds are available, and since multiple factors are involved in the decision process, many fine LOI’s will not result in grant awards. In fact, due to these factors, it is sometimes difficult to identify one specific reason why a particular LOI is chosen over another. However, taken as a whole, we believe that our commitment to a process that involves due diligence, discernment and prayer, results in God-pleasing choices from among many outstanding options.

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Concept Papers received are diligently reviewed through a process directed by the office of the Executive Director. As part of the review process, clarification and amplification of LOI’s is usually requested. In addition, a full grant proposal (when requested by CNAMF) is circulated to a variety of resource people for the purpose of receiving input regarding the viability of the proposal as well as the capacity and credibility of the sponsoring organization. These resource people include various members of the Native American community, as well as other volunteers from around the United States who have specific expertise in various aspects of Native American Leadership.

Based on information provided in the LOI, all requests are assessed and a gradual process of prioritization occurs. Those Concept Papers approved by the Grants Committee will be invited to submit a full proposal. The number of grants awarded is based on funds available.

Several important questions are addressed during the consideration process. These questions include:

– Does the Concept Paper meet the criteria stated in the grant guidelines?
– Does the project present a particularly unique or interesting opportunity in terms of the issue it addresses, the population it serves, or the solutions it offers?
– Will a grant for this project help CNAMF further its mission and pursue its current priorities and interests, including major strategic initiatives and components, geographic diversity, congregation and church body involvement, and fostering important partnerships and relationships?

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The Board of Directors of Cook Native American Ministries Foundation (CNAMF) establishes outcome and limitations policies to guide the decisions of CNAMF’s Staff. The Executive Director is accountable to the Board of Directors for all program efforts, including Grants Programs and grant award decisions. To accomplish these responsibilities, the Executive Director is assisted by a Staff, primarily through the office administrators, who provide for day-to-day activities. Ultimately, the Board of Directors makes all grant decisions.

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It is a permanent fund, consisting primarily of estate gifts, the proceeds of the Cook School campus sale and donor restricted gifts. The endowment is conservatively invested for growth and income. The assets of the fund are set aside and invested so that only the interest and dividends on the principal may be used for funding grants. The endowment grows through careful investing and appreciation of capital. It also grows through gifts and bequests.

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CNAMF sold its valuable school property in Tempe Arizona in July 2015. This fourteen acre urban campus was considered sacred land because it was used so effectively for ministry with Native People. Because the land was sacred, the proceeds of the sale are vigorously protected: only the endowed earnings of land sale’s investments and donor-restricted gifts will be used towards grants. We believe that CNAMF must generate philanthropic support for its own internal operations today. Rather than rely on our endowment to sustain ourselves, we are committed to growing more Native American leaders by sharing our abundance in strategic relationships with other charities.

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Cook Native American Ministries Foundation CNAMF provides seed grants to continue the vision of Rev. Charles H. Cook, CNAMF’s founder, who served as a missionary in the Southwest more than 106 years ago. Cook was persuaded that Native People possessed a vibrant culture, hospitable to Christianity, with many individuals who were gifted for leadership and effective at spreading the Christian message. Cook’s passion and legacy was in equipping Native Americans for leadership in church and society.

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